Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Super Tuesday’

The results are in from Super Tuesday, but the news media is still undecided about what margin of victory one candidate can claim over the other.

Interestingly, NBC News has Obama edging Clinton by 4 delegates to put him in the lead among Democrats, though the other outlets have Hillary with sizeable (nearly 100 point) leads. My last update to the GOP Tracker showed that each news source agreed on what the delegate count was as of the end of January, but with the Super Tuesday results they are clearly bouncing around the mark.

I’ve been working hard on campaign related issues leading up to Super Tuesday and the posts have fallen a bit behind my regular schedule. I’ll be re-doubling my efforts in the next few days to get my non-award winning analysis out to you in a more timely and reliable fashion. For now, here’s the starting point for the next week or so of digesting just what’s going in the battleground that is the American Political Landscape.

2-6.jpggop-tracker-2-6.jpg

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Clinton Laughs with Reporters After Giants WinHillary Clinton ruined almost any chance of holding on to the white male vote in Massachusetts and Connecticut on Super Tuesday.

New York Times writer Patrick Healey caught up with Hillary late last night after the Patriots loss. With the classic arrogance of a winning football time behind her, she dared to stomp on the bruised hearts of New England football fans in two very important primary states….

quote01.jpgTold that Mr. Obama was supporting the Patriots – the home team of his supporters Edward M. Kennedy, John Kerry, and Gov. Deval Patrick of Massachusetts, Mrs. Clinton grinned and said, “Hm, I wonder why.”

And reminded that she had two campaign stops in Massachusetts on Monday, she joked: “They can redeem themselves on Tuesday – they can vote for a winner.”

This is perhaps the most ill-advised remark she has made in recent memory. If there’s one thing in New England that we take seriously (aside from politics) it’s sports.

Invented under an elm tree in Boston, fealty to our home-town and all that dwell within it has been borne upon the American experience since the Sons of Liberty . You might have heard of them. They were the guys who tarred and feathered tax collectors for a perceived censorship of newspapers.

Idiotic remarks made by public officials printed in newspapers are a celebrated staple of our residents and this one will not pass without a humiliating backlash. Throwing salt on the wounds of New England sports fans when you need them to vote for you tomorrow is about as smart, politically, as getting caught punching a kitten on camera.

Obama was behind in Massachusetts. Somehow if this story gets the press it deserves here in the Bay State, Hillary might shed those two or three extra delegates she has been battling for.

Read Full Post »

connecticut01.jpg The State of Connecticut votes this year on Super Tuesday, February 5th in what is called a ‘closed primary’. I’ve noticed that my previous posts on other state primaries have been extremely useful for readers, so I’d like to duplicate this for residents throughout the country. Each post is assembled on the Voter’s Guide page for your future reference.

Connecticut residents are facing perhaps the most important presidential primary they have ever voted in. The nominations have never been so in flux in nearly a generation. Both parties do not have a clear winner, and each campaign is shifting their focus to a long term outlook. In fact, we might see both the Democrats and Republicans fighting this one out until the summer.

2008 therefore is no longer about Iowa and New Hampshire. It’s about Super Tuesday and the states that follow. And Connecticut sits in a position of power to determine who the nominee may eventually be.

In light of this, I feel it is necessary to share a quick history and voter’s guide to the most salient questions I’ve been asked about Connecticut and Super Tuesday. A political professional for nearly 10 years, I hope that this guide helps to answer all of your questions. If you have further ones, feel free to leave a comment.

Can I vote in the Connecticut Primary?

Only if you are a registered to vote prior to Thursday, January 31st or if you show up in person to register by February 4th 2008 at your town hall.

Can Independents vote in the Connecticut Primary?

No.

Why can’t Independents vote in the Connecticut Primary?

The State of Connecticut votes in what is known as a ‘closed primary’. This means that only those voters who have officially declared their membership in the Republican or Democratic parties may participate.

Closed primaries are a unique example of a political party’s interest in keeping active participation in the party going strong.

connecticut02.jpg Unfortunately, this type of primary traditionally has lower turnout since only those who are officially declared as a member of a party are permitted to vote. Furthermore, many Independents find this system to be a disincentive to pay attention to the primary elections and therefore pay little mind to the race until the General Election.

Does the Connecticut Primary matter?

Despite Independent voters being barred from participating, the Connecticut Primary still matters a great deal to the overall 2008 Election. When a presidential primary comes to a state like Connecticut and the voting can still determine the outcome, it is a rare opportunity for voters to have their voices heard nationally.

If you are a Democrat, your vote will contribute to your candidate’s delegate total when it comes to convention time. Even if your candidate doesn’t win Connecticut, the better he or she does, the more delegates he or she will have to potentially be the nominee.

If you are a Republican, let’s face it, your vote is probably even more important in determining your party’s nominee. This race is still completely up for grabs. After February 5th is done and your vote is counted, we might see someone claim the mantle of frontrunner (see my other post on Why Super Tuesday Is So Important)

What resources are out there for me?

I’m afraid that not many will go this length in explaining the logic of our primary system to you, but I will point you in the right direction for better details on what to expect on Election Day.

Connecticut Secretary of State’s Office

What’s Next?

Check back here for updates and bookmark the above pages. And be sure to leave a comment if you have any questions.

Read Full Post »

colorado01.jpgThe State of Colorado votes this year on Super Tuesday, February 5th in what is called a caucus or a ‘closed primary’. I’ve noticed that my previous posts on other state primaries have been extremely useful for readers, so I’d like to duplicate this for residents throughout the country. Each post is assembled on the Voter’s Guide page for your future reference. I have used liberally from Common Cause Colorado as well, who have a spectacular page of information in this as well.

Colorado residents are facing perhaps the most important presidential caucuses they have ever voted in. The nominations have never been so in flux in nearly a generation. Both parties do not have a clear winner, and each campaign is shifting their focus to a long term outlook. In fact, we might see both the Democrats and Republicans fighting this one out until the summer.

2008 therefore is no longer about Iowa and New Hampshire. It’s about Super Tuesday and the states that follow. And Colorado sits in a position of power to determine who the nominee may eventually be.

In light of this, I feel it is necessary to share a quick history and voter’s guide to the most salient questions I’ve been asked about Colorado and Super Tuesday. A political professional for nearly 10 years, I hope that this guide helps to answer all of your questions. If you have further ones, feel free to leave a comment.

Can I vote in the Colorado Caucus?

Only if you are a registered to vote prior to Monday, January 7th and are a declared member of either the Democratic or Republican party. At the time of this writing it looks like the deadline has passed for all of you who have not yet registered. Sorry kids.

Can Independents vote in the Colorado Caucus?

No.

Why can’t Independents vote in the Colorado Caucus?

The State of Colorado votes in what is known as a closed primary or caucus. This means that only those voters who have officially declared their membership in the Republican or Democratic parties may participate.

Closed primaries or caucuses are a unique example of a political party’s interest in keeping active participation in the party going strong.

Unfortunately, this type of primary traditionally has lower turnout since only those who are officially declared as a member of a party are permitted to vote. Furthermore, many Independents find this system to be a disincentive to pay attention to the primary elections and therefore pay little mind to the race until the General Election.

What is a caucus?

Caucuses are local meetings conducted by the Democratic and Republican parties held in precincts throughout the state. At the caucus, voters are divided into groups according to the candidate they support. The undecided voters congregate into their own group and prepare to be “counted” by supporters of other candidates. Voters in each group can then give speeches supporting their candidate and try to persuade others to join their group. At the end of the caucus, party organizers count the voters in each candidate’s group and calculate how many delegates to the county convention each candidate has won. This is the first step in a multi-step process to elect delegates to represent Colorado at the national convention.

The caucus has three main functions:

1. To elect Delegates/Alternates to the County Assembly and Convention

2. To elect two precinct committee people for 2-year terms and;

3. To vote on proposed platform issues

Do we also have a primary in Colorado? If so, what is the difference between the caucus and the primary?

Yes. In Colorado we use both the caucus and primary systems.

colorado02.jpgA caucus is where party members get together in their precincts to pledge their support for a favorite presidential candidate. Delegates are then awarded to the candidates based on the votes taken at the caucuses. The delegates then attend county assemblies and the state convention to vote on the party platform and “carry” the votes from their precinct. The state convention then awards delegates based on the results from the state as a whole.

The Colorado primary is for state-level and congressional offices only. A primary is simply an election that allows registered voters (with a specific party) to go to the polls and cast their ballot for a candidate. In Colorado, our primaries are closed, which means you must be a member of the party to vote for that party’s candidate.

The caucuses and the primaries finally culminate in a national convention in which the party’s nomination for president is formally announced. During the conventions, the elected delegates cast their vote for a party candidate and the candidate with the most delegates gets the party’s nomination. The end of the convention marks the beginning of the general election season.

Does the Colorado Caucus matter?

Despite Independent voters being barred from participating, the Colorado Caucus still matters a great deal to the overall 2008 Election. When a presidential primary comes to a state like Colorado and the voting can still determine the outcome, it is a rare opportunity for voters to have their voices heard nationally.

If you are a Democrat, your vote will contribute to your candidate’s delegate total when it comes to convention time. Even if your candidate doesn’t win Colorado, the better he or she does, the more delegates he or she will have to potentially be the nominee.

If you are a Republican, let’s face it, your vote is probably even more important in determining your party’s nominee. This race is still completely up for grabs. After February 5th is done and your vote is counted, we might see someone claim the mantle of frontrunner (see my other post on Why Super Tuesday Is So Important)

What resources are out there for me?

I’m afraid that not many will go this length in explaining the logic of our primary system to you, but I will point you in the right direction for better details on what to expect on Election Day.

Colorado Secretary of State’s Office

Where is my caucus held?

Typically caucuses are held in local public places. Contact the party you are affiliated with to find out where your caucus is being held. The Colorado caucus will be held on February 5, 2008.

www.coloradodems.org – Colorado Democratic Party

www.cologop.org – Colorado Republican Party

What’s Next?

Check back here for updates and bookmark the above pages. And be sure to leave a comment if you have any questions.

Read Full Post »

After South Carolina, most of the media outlets still have the delegate count at some widely different margins. On the GOP side however, it’s all coming together. After Super Tuesday, I’ll winnow the Democratic field down to just two candidates (given that Edwards is dropping out today) and I’ll look to only one or two sources for the GOP tracker. Enjoy.

thinkmatter’s Democratic Delegate Tracker 1-30-08

thinkmatter’s Republican Delegate Tracker 1-30-08

Read Full Post »

arkansas01.jpgThe State of Arkansas votes this year on Super Tuesday, February 5th in what is called an ‘open primary’. All those who are registered to vote in Arkansas may vote in the presidential primary, regardless of party affiliation. I will do my best to outline some of the details of this election system for you.

But first, I’d like to say that Arkansas residents are facing perhaps the most important presidential primary they have ever voted in. The nominations have never been so in flux in nearly a generation. Both parties do not have a clear winner, and each campaign is shifting their focus to a long term outlook. In fact, we might see both the Democrats and Republicans fighting this one out until the summer.

2008 therefore is no longer about Iowa and New Hampshire. It’s about Super Tuesday and the states that follow. And Arkansas sits in a position of power to determine who the nominee may eventually be.

In light of this, let me share a quick history and voter’s guide to the most salient questions I’ve been asked about Arkansas and Super Tuesday. A political professional for nearly 10 years, I hope that this guide helps to answer all of your questions. If you have further ones, feel free to leave a comment.

Can I vote in the Arkansas Primary?

Only if you are a registered to vote prior to Monday, January 7th. At the time of this writing it looks like the deadline has passed for all of you who have not yet registered.

Can Independents vote in the Arkansas Primary?

Yes. When you go to the polls, you will be asked which ballot you want. You many only vote either the Democratic or Republican Primary, not both. If you are a registered Democrat or Republican you also have the option of voting in either party’s primary, but again, not both.

Why can Independents vote in the Arkansas Primary? And why can Democrats vote in the Republican Primary and vice versa?

The State of Arkansas votes in what is known as an ‘open primary’. This means that as long as you have registered to vote in time, you will be allowed to choose whether you want a Republican or Democratic ballot.

Open primaries are somewhat unique. They allow any resident to pick up a ballot and cast a vote for whomever they wish, regardless of their personal party affiliation. Much like the General Election, you are free to choose who you want.

Many Independents find this system to be geared favorably towards them and typically more moderate politicians fare well in an open primary. Open primaries traditionally have better turnout since more people feel comfortable voting that day since they don’t have to officially declare that they belong to a party.

Interestingly, some voters are skeptical of this system. When Democrats are allowed to vote in a Republican primary (and vice versa) many feel that this may cause some form of impropriety. While this may be the case, the party’s allow open primaries because they feel the risk of an overwhelming amount of cross-over voting is significantly low. Though some might choose to cross-over and vote in another party’s primary to skew the vote, there is minimal (if any) danger that it will negatively affect the outcome.

arkansas02.jpgDoes the Arkansas Primary matter?

With the Mike Huckabee undertone of this election put aside, I can confidently say that the primary matters a great deal. When a presidential primary comes to a state like Arkansas and the voting will still determine the outcome, it is a rare opportunity for voters to have their voices heard nationally.

If you are a Democrat, your vote will contribute to your candidate’s delegate total when it comes to convention time. Even if your candidate doesn’t win Arkansas, the better he or she does, the more delegates he or she will have to potentially be the nominee.

If you are a Republican, let’s face it, your vote is probably even more important in determining your party’s nominee. This race is still completely up for grabs. After February 5th is done and your vote is counted, we might see someone claim the mantle of frontrunner.

If you’re an Independent voter, you should feel equally enamored. Independents are widely known to be the heartbeat of the voting public whose opinions are frequently the basis for the ‘mandate’ that new presidents talk about during their first days. There should be no doubt that the candidates want your vote more than anything else. If you help in choosing either of the nominees, you’ll help shape the next 4 years of public policy. (see my other post on Why Super Tuesday Is So Important)

What resources are out there for me?

I’m afraid that not many will go this length in explaining the logic of our primary system to you, but I will point you in the right direction for better details on what to expect on Election Day.

Arkansas Secretary of State’s Office

What’s Next?

Check back here for updates and bookmark the above pages. And be sure to leave a comment if you have any questions.

Read Full Post »

arizona03.jpgThe State of Arizona votes this year on Super Tuesday, February 5th in what is called a ‘closed primary’. I’ve noticed that my previous post on other state primaries have been extremely useful for readers, so I’d like to duplicate this for residents throughout the country. Each post is assembled on the Voter’s Guide page for your future reference.

The backdrop of Senator McCain’s historic run for president aside, Arizona residents are facing perhaps the most important presidential primary they have ever voted in. The nominations have never been so in flux in nearly a generation. Both parties do not have a clear winner, and each campaign is shifting their focus to a long term outlook. In fact, we might see both the Democrats and Republicans fighting this one out until the summer.

2008 therefore is no longer about Iowa and New Hampshire. It’s about Super Tuesday and the states that follow. And Arizona sits in a position of power to determine who the nominee may eventually be.

In light of this, I feel it is necessary to share a quick history and voter’s guide to the most salient questions I’ve been asked about Arizona and Super Tuesday. A political professional for nearly 10 years, I hope that this guide helps to answer all of your questions. If you have further ones, feel free to leave a comment.

Can I vote in the Arizona Primary?

Only if you are a registered to vote prior to Monday, January 7th and are a declared member of either the Democratic or Republican party. At the time of this writing it looks like the deadline has passed for all of you who have not yet registered. Sorry kids.

Can Independents vote in the Arizona Primary?

No.

Why can’t Independents vote in the Arizona Primary?

The State of Arizona votes in what is known as a ‘closed primary’. This means that only those voters who have officially declared their membership in the Republican or Democratic parties may participate.

Closed primaries are a unique example of a political party’s interest in keeping active participation in the party going strong.

Unfortunately, this type of primary traditionally has lower turnout since only those who are officially declared as a member of a party are permitted to vote. Furthermore, many Independents find this system to be a disincentive to pay attention to the primary elections and therefore pay little mind to the race until the General Election.

arizona01.jpgDoes the Arizona Primary matter?

Despite Independent voters being barred from participating, the Arizona Primary still matters a great deal to the overall 2008 Election. When a presidential primary comes to a state like Arizona and the voting can still determine the outcome, it is a rare opportunity for voters to have their voices heard nationally.

If you are a Democrat, your vote will contribute to your candidate’s delegate total when it comes to convention time. Even if your candidate doesn’t win Arizona, the better he or she does, the more delegates he or she will have to potentially be the nominee.

If you are a Republican, let’s face it, your vote is probably even more important in determining your party’s nominee. This race is still completely up for grabs. After February 5th is done and your vote is counted, we might see someone claim the mantle of frontrunner (see my other post on Why Super Tuesday Is So Important)

What resources are out there for me?

I’m afraid that not many will go this length in explaining the logic of our primary system to you, but I will point you in the right direction for better details on what to expect on Election Day.

Arizona Secretary of State’s Office

What’s Next?

Check back here for updates and bookmark the above pages. And be sure to leave a comment if you have any questions.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »